Chat With a Doctor: Scoliosis

Tuesday, June 26, 2012, noon (ET)

Chat With a Doctor: Scoliosis

Register for Online Chat Advertising Policy Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Do you have a question about scoliosis for children and adults you would like to ask a doctor? Pediatric scoliosis specialist Thomas Kuivila, … Read More

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Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Do you have a question about scoliosis for children and adults you would like to ask a doctor?

Pediatric scoliosis specialist Thomas Kuivila, MD, of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Pediatric Orthopaedics, and an adult scoliosis specialist, Richard Schlenk, MD, of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Spine Health, will answer your questions about this medical problem. Get answers to your health questions and concerns. It’s easy to be part of our live chat events, led by Cleveland Clinic doctors and health professionals.

Scoliosis in Children and Adults Live Web Chat on June 26

Live Web Chat: noon to 1 p.m. (ET) on June 26, 2012.

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Featured Expert
Thomas Kuivila, MD

  • Physician and Surgeon
  • Center for Pediatric Orthopaedics
  • Featured Expert
    Richard Schlenk, MD

  • Physician and Surgeon
  • Center for Spine Health
  • Scoliosis is an abnormal sideways curvature and rotation of the spine. About 2 to 3 percent of the U.S. population, or 7 million people, have this condition.

    Scoliosis may be detected in infancy, childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. While this condition affects both males and females, females are 10 times more likely than males to need corrective surgery for it.

    Pay attention to whether or not scoliosis progresses. Curves that are larger have a greater chance of progressing than smaller curves. However, even mild curvatures may worsen as a child’s spine grows.

    Progression can lead to severe consequences in adulthood, including lung and heart problems and potential back pain. That’s why it’s important to detect scoliosis as early as possible, monitor its progress and intervene when necessary.

    Thomas Kuivila, MD, staff physician and surgeon in the Center for Pediatric Orthopaedics, sees patients up to age 21.

    Richard Schlenk, MD, staff physician and surgeon in the Center for Spine Health sees patients ages 21 and older.

    This health chat will open on Tuesday, June 26, 2012, to allow you to submit questions. We will try to answer as many questions as possible during the chat. Please create an account to attend the chat and submit your questions.

     

    Source; https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2012/06/chat-with-a-doctor-scoliosis/

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